Catena Institute of Wine and UC Davis Host “The Future of Wine Science,” A Joint Educational Conference

PR NEWSWIRE | “The Catena Institute of Wine, in partnership with the department of viticulture and enology at University of California, Davis, hosted “The Future of Wine Science,” a joint educational conference on August 31, 2015. Held at the Davis campus, the program highlighted the Institute’s 20-year journey to elevate Argentine wine and its collaboration with UC Davis in the study of Malbec and phylloxera.”
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Do you get wine shipped from out-of-state? That may be about to end. Here’s why.

THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC | “The Arizona liquor department cracked down this summer on wineries that ship bottles to consumers’ homes, slapping more than 150 businesses with notices that they are violating liquor laws. As a result, a long list of out-of-state wineries agreed to stop shipping wine to Arizona consumers.”
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Winery wastewater a viable water source for vineyards

UC DAVIS | “Making wine requires water beyond what it takes to grow grapes. There are bottles to wash, barrels to scrub and floors to clean. But what if the water left over from all that cleaning was treated and reused to irrigate vineyards? It sounds like a promising practice, especially during a drought, but would it hurt the vines, the soil or even the wine?”
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Are California wine prices way too high?

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | “If I’ve learned one lesson from recommending thousands of bottles to readers, it’s this: Prices always make someone unhappy. If I complained about, oh, Sonoma Pinot Noirs surpassing $50 a bottle, I’d hear from winemakers insisting that was actually too cheap (pro tip: Never make this argument to a wine critic) but also from readers who thought $35 was too much. Let’s not even touch the readers whose price cap was $10.”
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Local Microbes Give Wine Character

THE SCIENTIST | “The distinct regional conditions, or terroir, in which grapes are grown are thought to shape a wine’s character. But strict scientific evidence of this phenomenon has been lacking. Now, researchers in Auckland, New Zealand, have confirmed that at least one aspect of terroir—local differences in yeast strains—does indeed alter the outcome of Sauvignon Blanc fermentation. Their findings were published today (September 24) in Scientific Reports.”
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